Body Dynamics

Heath, Fitness Training and Massage Therapy

BMR Calculator

HOW TO: Calculate Your Daily Calorie Needs

Exactly how much food can you eat each day to maintain your weight? This formula is the start point for many weight loss programs. Once you determine your daily caloric needs, you can begin to lower calories until fat loss occurs. It's hardly an exact science - there is no simple formula that takes into account body composition, ethnicity, the thermic affect of nutrients, body surface area, and all the myriad other factors that come together to create your own unique metabolic rate.

Calorie Intake Calculator
Years

Sex:

Feet   Inches
RESULTS
3068 Calories/day
1841 - 2454 Calories/day

Every calorie calculator is a starting point - no more. If you plan your diet with a more scientific approach (i.e. you count calories) - figuring out your daily maintenance level is a must. Personally I've found that it helped me to learn the amount of food that was "normal" for me. However obsessively counting calories was not something I could do forever.

This calculator uses the Mifflin formula, which currently appears to be one of the most accurate predictive equations for both normal weight and obese individuals. The calculator predicts REE (Resting Energy Expenditure). Exercise levels are then factored in. Fat loss levels are calculated by subtracting 20% of daily calories. There is always a "rock bottom" value factored in - which is 8 calories per pound of body weight.

Most calculators you see on the web use the Harris-Benedict equation. However this equation is rather old (c. 1919), and many argue that with today's body weights and lack of exercise, the formula tends to overestimate calories.

As stated previously - even the very best calculator is a "best guess". A recent study into this very subject  concluded: "One has to be careful in choosing, understanding and clinically applying the results from predictive equations, bearing in mind that the original population from which the equation was derived does not always correspond to that currently being evaluated.

Percent Body Fat Norms for Men and Women

Description Women Men
Essential Fat 10-13% 2-5%
Athletes 14-20% 6-13%
Fitness 21-24% 14-17%
Acceptable 25-31% 18-24%
Obesity >32% >25%

Calculate Your Percent Body Fat

Age

Sex

Enter Skinfold measurements (milimeters)

Chest (mm)

Thigh (mm)

Abdomen (mm)


For men, the skinfold sites are:

  • Chest: A diagonal skinfold taken midway on the anterior axillary line (crease of the underarm and the nipple)
  • Thigh: A vertical skinfold taken midway between the hip and knee joints on the front of the thigh
  • Abdomen: a vertical skinfold taken 1 inch lateral to the umbilicus

For women, the skinfold sites are:

  • Triceps: A vertical fold on the back of the upper arm taken halfway between the acromion (shoulder) and olecranon (elbow) processes
  • Thigh: A vertical skinfold taken midway between the hip and knee joints on the front of the thigh
  • Suprailium: A diagonal fold taken at, or just anterior to, the crest of the ilium

Calculate Your Fat & Lean Mass

Bodyweight (lbs)

Percent Body Fat (calculated above)

Activity Calculator

Fitness Partner: Activity Calorie Calculator
http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner

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Gym Activities
Aerobics: low impact   Aerobics: high impact  
Aerobics, Step: 6" - 8" step   Aerobics, Step: 10" - 12" step  
Aerobics: water   Bicycling, Stationary: moderate, 150 watts  
Bicycling, Stationary: vigorous, 200 watts   Calisthenics: Vigorous, jumping jacks, push-ups, sit-ups, pullups  
Calisthenics: Moderate, back exercises, going up and down from the floor   Circuit Training: w/some aerobic, minimal rest  
Elliptical Trainer: general   Riders: general (ie., HealthRider)  
Rowing, Stationary: moderate, 100 watts   Rowing, Stationary: vigorous, 150 watts  
Ski Machine: general   Stair Step Machine: General, without supporting any bodyweight on hand rails   
Stretching: Mild, Hatha Yoga   Teaching aerobics  
Weight Lifting: Light, free weight, nautilus or universal-type   Weight Lifting: Vigorous, free weight, nautilus or universal-type  
Training and Sport Activities
Archery: non-hunting   Badminton: general, social  
Basketball: playing a game   Basketball: wheelchair  
Basketball: shooting baskets   Basketball: officiating a game  
Billiards   Bicycling: BMX or mountain  
Bicycling: 12-13.9 mph, leisure, moderate effort   Bicycling: 14-15.9 mph, leisure racing, fast, vigorous  
Bicycling: 16-19 mph, very fast, not drafting   Bicycling: > 20 mph, racing, not drafting  
Bowling   Boxing: sparring  
Boxing: punching bag   Boxing: in the ring  
Coaching: football, soccer, basketball, etc.   Cricket: batting, bowling  
Curling   Dancing: Fast, ballet, twist  
Dancing: disco, ballroom, square, line, Irish step, polka   Dancing: slow, waltz, foxtrot, tango, fox trot  
Fencing   Football: competitive  
Football: touch, flag, general   Football or Baseball: playing catch  
Frisbee: general   Frisbee: Ultimate  
Golf: carrying clubs   Golf: using cart  
Golf: driving range, miniature   Golf: walking and pulling clubs  
Gymnastics: general   Hacky sack  
Handball: general   Handball: team  
Hang Gliding   Hiking: cross-country  
Hockey: field & ice   Horseback Riding: general  
Ice Skating: general   Kayaking  
Martial Arts: judo, karate, kick boxing, tae kwan do   Motor-Cross  
Orienteering   Polo  
Race Walking   Racquetball: competitive  
Racquetball: casual, general   Rock Climbing: ascending  
Rock Climbing: rappelling   Rollerblade / In-Line Skating  
Rope Jumping: general, moderate   Running: 5 mph (12 min/mile)  
Running: 5.2 mph (11.5 min/mile)   Running: 6 mph (10 min/mile)  
Running: 6.7 mph (9 min/mile)   Running: 7 mph (8.5 min/mile)  
Running: 8.6 mph (7 min/mile)   Running: 10 mph (6 min/mile)  
Running: training, pushing wheelchair, marathon wheeling   Running: cross-country  
Running: stairs, up   Running: on track, team practice  
Scuba or skin diving   Skateboarding  
Skiing: cross-country, light effort, general, 2.5 mph   Skiing: cross-country, vigorous, 5.0 - 7.9 mph  
Skiing: downhill, moderate effort   Skiing: downhill, vigorous effort, racing  
Sky diving   Sledding, luge, toboggan, bobsled  
Snorkeling   Snow Shoeing  
Soccer: general   Soccer: competitive play  
Softball or Baseball: slow or fast pitch, general   Softball: Officiating  
Softball: pitching   Squash  
Surfing: body or board   Swimming: general, leisurely, no laps  
Swimming: laps, vigorous   Swimming: backstroke  
Swimming: breaststroke   Swimming: butterfly  
Swimming: crawl, moderate, 50 yds/min   Swimming: treading, moderate effort  
Swimming: lake, ocean, river   Swimming: synchronized  
Table Tennis / Ping Pong   Tai Chi  
Tennis: singles, competitive   Tennis: doubles, competitive  
Tennis: general play   Track & Field: shot, discus, hammer throw  
Track & Field: high jump, long jump, triple jump, javelin, pole vault   Track & Field: steeplechase, hurdles  
Volleyball: non-competitive, general play, 6 - 9 member team   Volleyball: competitive, gymnasium play  
Volleyball: beach   Walk: 2 mph (30 min/mi)  
Walk: 3 mph (20 min/mi)   Walk: 3.5 mph (17 min/mi)  
Walk: 4 mph (15 min/mi)   Walk: 4.5 mph (13 min/mi)  
Walk: 5 mph (12 min/mi)   Water Skiing  
Water Polo   Water Volleyball  
Whitewater: rafting, kayaking   Wrestling: one match = 5 minutes  
Outdoor Home Maintenance / Improvement Activities
Carpentry, installing rain gutters, building fence   Carrying & stacking wood  
Chopping & splitting wood   Cleaning rain gutters  
Digging, spading dirt, composting   Gardening: general  
Gardening: weeding   Laying sod / crushed rock  
Mowing Lawn: push, hand   Mowing Lawn: push, power  
Operate Snow Blower: walking   Paint outside of home  
Planting seedlings, shrubs   Plant trees  
Raking Lawn   Roofing  
Sacking grass or leaves   Shoveling Snow: by hand  
Storm Windows: hanging   Sweeping: garage, sidewalks, outside of house  
Trimming shrubs/trees: manual cutter   Trimming: using edger, power cutter, etc.  
Watering plants, by hand   Workshop: general carpentry  
Yard: applying seed or fertilizer, walking   Yard: watering by hand, standing/walking  
Indoor Home Repair / Improvement Activities
Carpentry: finish or refinish furniture or cabinets   Caulking: bathroom, windows  
Crafts: Standing, light effort   Hang sheet rock, paper or plaster walls  
Lay or remove carpet/tile   Paint, paper, remodel: inside  
Sanding floors with a power sander   Wiring and Plumbing  
Home & Daily Life Activities
Child-care: bathing, feeding, etc.   Child games: moderate, hop-scotch, jacks, etc.  
Cleaning House: general   Cleaning: light dusting, straightening up, taking out trash, etc.  
Cooking / Food Preparation   Food Shopping: with or without cart  
Heavy Cleaning: wash car, windows   Ironing  
Making Bed   Moving: household furniture  
Moving: carrying boxes   Moving: unpacking  
Playing w/kids: moderate effort   Playing w/kids: vigorous effort  
Reading: sitting   Standing in line  
Standing: bathing dog   Sleeping  
Vacuuming   Watching TV  
Office Activities
Driving vehicle to work   Sitting: light office work, meeting  
Standing: filing, light work   Riding in a bus or vehicle to work  
Typing: Computer, electric or manual   Walking: work break  
Occupational Activities
Bartending/Server   Bakery: general, moderate effort  
Building Road: hauling debris, driving heavy machinery   Carpentry Work  
Coaching Sports   Coal Mining  
Computer Work   Construction: outside, remodeling  
Custodial Word: general cleaning, moderate effort   Electrical Work  
Firefighting   Forestry, general  
Forestry: planting trees by hand   Heavy Equip. Operator  
Horse Grooming   Light Office Work  
Locksmith   Masonry  
Masseur, standing   Moving / Pushing heavy objects >75 lbs.   
Patient Care: Nursing   Plumbing  
Police Officer: making an arrest   Printing: operator, standing  
Sitting in Class   Shoe Repair: general  
Steel Mill: general   Theater Work  
Truck Driving: loading and unloading truck   Welding  

 

Let's do it again . . .

 

Weight (in lbs.):
Duration (in min.):

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Enzyme Deficiency Test

 

 

Please enter some personal info to get started and to be entered into a drawing to win a prize (Optional)
First Name:
Last Name:
*Email Address:
Enzymedica and its affiliates agree they will not publish or sell your personal information for any reason
Age Category:
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*Where did you hear about this test:
Promo Code:
Enzymedica respects your privacy and only with your permission would be pleased to send occasional updates, education and special offers.  Would you like to receive occasional correspondence from Enzymedica?
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Have you ever asked yourself, `How is it possible that I am sick even though I eat organic foods and am very careful with my diet?' The answer most likely revolves around an ENZYME DEFICIENCY. An enzyme deficiency can manifest itself as a variety of conditions.

The most well-known symptoms of enzyme deficiency are indigestion and gas. But did you know that there are a host of other health challenges in which an enzyme-deficient diet can play a role? To understand how one could become enzyme-deficient, a person has to understand that cooked foods have no live, viable enzyme activity left. So many people today eat mostly cooked foods. Even when we eat raw foods, we typically only get the enzymes needed to digest the food itself and supply our body with those nutrients. There are not enzymes left over for taking care of all the other fast foods, fried foods, sugary foods, white flour foods, etc. Add to this the fact that stress depletes enzymes and it becomes easier to see how a person could be enzyme-deficient, even if they regularly eat some raw foods. Age is a factor too because while it is true that our body can make enyzmes, it makes less as we grow older.

 

Please enter some personal info to get started and to be entered into a drawing to win a prize (Optional)
First Name:
Last Name:
*Email Address:
Enzymedica and its affiliates agree they will not publish or sell your personal information for any reason
Age Category:
Gender:
*Where did you hear about this test:
Promo Code:
Enzymedica respects your privacy and only with your permission would be pleased to send occasional updates, education and special offers.  Would you like to receive occasional correspondence from Enzymedica?
Yes
 
       

 

 

Have you ever asked yourself, `How is it possible that I am sick even though I eat organic foods and am very careful with my diet?' The answer most likely revolves around an ENZYME DEFICIENCY. An enzyme deficiency can manifest itself as a variety of conditions.

The most well-known symptoms of enzyme deficiency are indigestion and gas. But did you know that there are a host of other health challenges in which an enzyme-deficient diet can play a role? To understand how one could become enzyme-deficient, a person has to understand that cooked foods have no live, viable enzyme activity left. So many people today eat mostly cooked foods. Even when we eat raw foods, we typically only get the enzymes needed to digest the food itself and supply our body with those nutrients. There are not enzymes left over for taking care of all the other fast foods, fried foods, sugary foods, white flour foods, etc. Add to this the fact that stress depletes enzymes and it becomes easier to see how a person could be enzyme-deficient, even if they regularly eat some raw foods. Age is a factor too because while it is true that our body can make enyzmes, it makes less as we grow older.